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Ocean Biology and Biogeochemistry Information

John - Jones --- Ocean - Biology - Final - 4 - Print

Images below are the images from the poster from left to right; top to bottom

Image Credit: Ocean Biology Distributed Active Archive Center (OB.DAAC)
Image Credit: Ocean Biology Distributed Active Archive Center (OB.DAAC)

Saharan Dust over the Ocean

This composite Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (Suomi-NPP) image, made with data from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on Suomi-NPP, shows dust heading west toward South America and the Gulf of Mexico on June 25, 2014. The dust flowed roughly parallel to a line of clouds in the intertropical convergence zone, an area near the equator where the trade winds come together and rain and clouds are common. Saharan dust has a range of impacts on ecosystems. Each year, dust events like the one pictured here deliver about 40 million tons of dust from the Sahara to the Amazon River Basin. The minerals in the dust replenish nutrients in rainforest soils, which are continually depleted by drenching, tropical rains. In some instances, the impacts are harmful. Infusion of Saharan dust, for instance, can have a negative impact on air quality in the Americas. And scientists have linked African dust to outbreaks of certain types of toxic algal blooms in the Gulf of Mexico and southern Florida.

Read more about VIIRS data distributed by NASA's Ocean Biology Distributed Active Archive Center (OB.DAAC).

Image caption: NASA Earth Observatory

(Top Row: Left)

Image Credit: NASA JPL
Image Credit: NASA JPL

Measuring Ocean Winds from Space

This International Space Station (ISS)-RapidScat image, acquired on May 11, 2015, shows the once Super Typhoon Noul (located in the Northwest Pacific Ocean). In this image, a very small area of excessively high winds are visible. Noul had already weakened when this image was captured by RapidScat on May 11. ISS-RapidScat data is available from the NASA Physical Oceanography DAAC (PO.DAAC).

(Top Row: Right)

Image Credit: NASA NSIDC DAAC
Image Credit: NASA NSIDC DAAC

Arctic Sea Ice Maximum Extent 2015

The Arctic sea ice extent for February 25, 2015 was 14.54 million square kilometers (5.61 million square miles). The orange line shows the 1981 to 2010 median extent for that day. The black cross indicates the geographic North Pole. This image is derived from the Sea Ice Index data product, which relies on NASA-developed methods using passive microwave data from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) F17 Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMIS). The basis for the Sea Ice Index is the data set, Near-Real-time DMSP SSM/I-SSMIS Daily Polar Gridded Sea Ice Concentrations, and the NASA-produced Sea Ice Concentrations from Nimbus-7 SMMR and DMSP SSM/I Passive Microwave Data. Read more about this image.

These data are available at the NASA National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) DAAC.

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Image Credit: NASA NSIDC DAAC
Image Credit: NASA NSIDC DAAC

Operation IceBridge - Greenland

This image shows flight paths (orange), from NASA’s Operation IceBridge multi-flight airborne mission, over the Jakobshavn Glacier in western Greenland. The paths are superimposed on a 2008-2009 ice velocity map showing areas of greatest movement in red. NASA’s Operation IceBridge Mission is a six-year airborne mission that images Earth's changing ice sheets of Greenland and Antarctica, the Alaskan glaciers, and sea ice in both hemispheres. Learn about the NASA IceBridge Mission.

IceBridge data and flight path reports are distributed through NSIDC DAAC. Access the NASA IceBridge Data Portal.

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Image Credit: NASA OB.DAAC
Image Credit: NASA OB.DAAC

Summer Phytoplankton in the Bering and Chukchi Seas

This Suomi-NPP Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) image shows summer phytoplankton in the Bering and Chukchi Seas. This image was acquired on June 20, 2015. NASA ocean color data is distributed by OB.DAAC. OB.DAAC distributes satellite ocean biology data produced or collected under NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS), including those from historical missions and partner space organizations.

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Image Credit: NASA PO.DAAC
Image Credit: NASA PO.DAAC

Global Sea Surface Temperature

This Multi-scale Ultra-high Resolution (MUR), Group for High-Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHSST) image shows global high-resolution sea surface temperature data acquired on July 7, 2015. GHRSST produces global and regional multi-sensor, high-resolution near real-time (NRT) and retrospective sea surface temperature (SST) products derived from infrared and microwave satellite measurements. Sea surface temperature and other physical oceanography data products are distributed through PO.DAAC.

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Image Credit: NASA JPL
Image Credit: NASA JPL

Global Sea Surface Height Anomalies

This Jason-2 Sea Surface Height (SSH) image shows global sea surface height anomalies for June 21, 2015. The Ocean Surface Topography Mission (OSTM)/Jason-2 mission is a follow-on altimetric mission to the very successful TOPEX/Poseidon mission and Jason-1 mission. It is a joint mission between NASA and The Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES). It launched June 20, 2008 and began data collection on July 12, 2008. Jason-2 data are distributed by PO.DAAC.

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Image Credit: NASA OB.DAAC
Image Credit: NASA OB.DAAC

Global Sea Surface Salinity - July 2014

The Aquarius/Satélite de Aplicaciones Científicas (SAC)-D satellite observatory was an international collaboration between NASA and Argentina's space agency, Comisión Nacional de Actividades Espaciales (CONAE), with participation from Brazil, Canada, France and Italy. NASA launched Aquarius/SAC-D from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California, on June 10, 2011 to measure global sea surface salinity from space. The Aquarius instrument successfully achieved its science objectives and completed its primary three-year mission in November 2014. Sea surface salinity data is available from PO.DAAC and OB.DAAC.

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Access our NASA Earthdata Data Discovery and Data Access Webinars and Tutorials

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Last Updated: Sep 6, 2017 at 5:04 PM EDT