Shipping

In polar regions near real-time satellite data, in combination with other data, to provide up to date information on ice conditions to ships and research vessels.

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Corrected Reflectance Imagery

Corrected Reflectance Imagery

MODIS and VIIRS Corrected Reflectance imagery are available only as near real-time imagery. The imagery can be visualized in Worldview and Global Imagery Browse Services (GIBS). More:

Information on MODIS Corrected Reflectance Imagery layers including

  • Corrected Reflectance True Color (Bands 1-4-3)
  • Corrected Reflectance (Bands 3-6-7)
  • Corrected Reflectance (Bands 7-2-1)

Information on VIIRS Corrected Reflectance Imagery layers including

  • Corrected Reflectance True Color (Bands I1-M4-M3)
  • Corrected Reflectance (Bands M3-I3-M11)
  • Corrected Reflectance (Bands M11-I2-I1)

Browse Corrected Reflectance imagery in Worldview

For more on the difference between Corrected Reflectance and Surface Reflectance Imagery

Brightness Temperature

Brightness Temperature

Brightness temperature (TB) data are particularly useful for sea ice studies because of the relatively high contrast in emissivities between open water and sea ice.

Product and Download Link

Description

Browse imagery in Worldview

AMSR2 (GCOM-W1)

AU_SI6_NRT_RO1

AMSR2 Brightness Temperature for Sea Ice (AMSR2)

The Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-E/Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-2 (AMSR-E/AMSR2) unified “Sea Ice Brightness Temperature (89H GHz)” and “Sea Ice Brightness Temperature (89V GHz)” layer displays daily averaged sea ice brightness temperatures (BTs) in kelvin at the polar regions for the 89 GHz horizontal (H) polarization channel and the 89 GHz vertical (V) polarization channel.

This product uses the JAXA AMSR2 Level-1R input BTs which are calibrated (unified) across the JAXA AMSR-E and AMSR2 Level-1R products.

The imagery resolution is 2 km and sensor resolution is 6.25 km. The temporal resolution is daily.

References: AMSR-E/AMSR2 Unified L3 Daily 6.25 km Polar Gridded 89 GHz Brightness Temperatures, Version 1

Brightness Temperature for Sea Ice (89V Ghz) | (89H Ghz), Day | Night
Arctic view
Antarctic view

MODIS (Terra)

MOD021KM


MODIS (Aqua

MYD021KM

MODIS Brightness Temperature (Band 31 - Day|Night)

The MODIS Brightness Temperature, Band 31 layer is the brightness temperature, measured in Kelvin (K), calculated from the top-of-the-atmosphere radiances. It does not provide an accurate temperature of either clouds nor the land surface, but it does show relative temperature differences which can be used to distinguish features both in clouds and over clear land. It can be used to distinguish land, sea ice, and open water over the polar regions during winter (in cloudless areas).

The MODIS Brightness Temperature layer is calculated from MODIS Calibrated Radiances and is available from both the Terra (MOD02) and Aqua (MYD02) satellites. The sensor and imagery resolution is 1 km, and the temporal resolution is daily.

References: MODIS - MODIS Calibrated Radiances

doi: 10.5067/MODIS/MOD021KM.NRT.061

Brightness Temperature (Band 31) Day|Night

VIIRS (Suomi-NPP)

VNP02IMG_NRT

VIIRS Brightness Temperature (Band I5 - Day|Night)

The VIIRS Brightness Temperature, Band I5, Day | Night layer is the brightness temperature, measured in Kelvin (K), calculated from the top-of-the-atmosphere radiances. It does not provide an accurate temperature of either clouds nor the land surface, but it does show relative temperature differences which can be used to distinguish features both in clouds and over clear land. It can be used to distinguish land, sea ice, and open water over the polar regions during winter (in cloudless areas).

The VIIRS Brightness Temperature layer is calculated from VIIRS Calibrated Radiances and is available from the Suomi-NPP (VNP02) satellite. The sensor resolution is 375m, the imagery resolution is 250m, and the temporal resolution is daily.

References: VIIRS SDR Users Guide

doi: 10.5067/VIIRS/VNP02IMG_NRT.001

Brightness Temperature (Band I5) Day|Night

Land Surface Reflectance

Land Surface Reflectance

In comparison with the MODIS Corrected Reflectance product, the MODIS Land Atmospherically Corrected Surface Reflectance product (MOD09) is a more complete atmospheric correction algorithm that includes aerosol correction, and is designed to derive land surface properties.

Product: Instrument, Platform and Download Link

Description

Browse imagery in Worldview

MODIS (Terra)
MOD09



MODIS (Aqua) MYD09




doi: 10.5067/MODIS/MYD09.NRT.006 (Aqua) and doi: 10.5067/MODIS/MOD09.NRT.006 (Terra)


More information on MODIS Land Surface Reflectance Products including:

MODIS (Aqua/Terra) Land Surface Reflectance True Color (Bands 1-4-3)
MODIS (Aqua/Terra) Land Surface Reflectance True Color (Bands 7-2-1)
MODIS (Aqua/Terra) Land Surface Reflectance True Color (Bands 1-2-1)

VIIRS (Suomi-NPP)
VNP09_NRT

VIIRS Land Surface Reflectance
The VIIRS Surface Reflectance provides continuity with the EOS-MODIS Land Surface Reflectance product.The Suomi-NPP/VIIRS surface reflectance products are estimates of surface reflectance in each of the VIIRS reflective bands I1-I3, M1-M5, M7, M8, M10, and M11. Surface reflectance for each moderate-resolution (750m) or imagery-resolution (375m) pixel is retrieved separately for the Level-2 products and is obtained by adjusting top-of-atmosphere reflectance to compensate for atmospheric effects. Corrections are made for the effects of molecular gases, including ozone and water vapor, and for the effects of atmospheric aerosols. The inputs to the surface reflectance algorithm include top-of-atmosphere reflectance for the VIIRS visible bands (VNP02MOD, VNP02IMG), the VIIRS cloud mask and aerosol product (NPP-CMIP_L2), aerosol optical thickness (NPP_VAOTIP_L2, NPP_VAMIP_L2), and atmospheric data obtained from a reanalysis (surface pressure, atmospheric precipitable water, and ozone concentration). All surface reflectance products are produced for daytime conditions only.

Surface Reflectance Browse imagery

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Sea Ice

Sea Ice

For near real-time applications, MODIS Sea Ice layer is useful for assessing the presence of sea ice in the ocean and other large water bodies. The presence of sea ice prohibits the passage of ships through the waters and an ice breaker vessel may be required to break up the ice before a ship may pass.

Product: Instrument, Platform and Download Link

Description

Browse imagery in Worldview

MODIS
(Terra)
MOD29



MODIS (Aqua) MYD29




The MODIS Sea Ice extent layer shows the presence of sea ice. Ice forms in the sea when air and sea temperatures are consistently cold. Some areas of the sea in the world are consistently covered in sea ice and the sea ice even builds up to form multi year ice packs, some areas only form sea ice in the winter. The presence of sea ice changes the normally dark blue ocean into solid white ice. This has an effect on the weather and earth’s climate. Sunlight that would normally be absorbed by the dark blue ocean is now reflected back by the ice, increasing the surface albedo. Sea ice regulates the amount of heat that escapes the ocean surface to warm the atmosphere.
The MODIS Sea Ice product is available from both the Terra (MOD29) and Aqua (MYD29) satellites. The sensor and imagery resolution is 1 km, and the temporal resolution is daily.
References: NSIDC - MOD29; NSIDC - MYD29; NASA Earth Observations - Sea Ice and Snow Extent

Sea Ice

Antarctica MODIS (Terra) Bands 3,6,7

Antarctica MODIS (Terra) Bands 3,6,7

Visualize NRT data related to Shipping in Worldview

By combining information from MODIS Bands 3-6-7, or VIIRS Bands M3-I3-M11, it is possible to differentiate sea ice from clouds. Red shades indicate ice, while tan and white shades indicate clouds. Such information can be used in conjunction with other data, to provide ships in the Antarctic with up-to-date information on sea ice conditions which are used to help ships safely plot their course through icy waters.

Last Updated: May 28, 2019 at 1:08 PM EDT