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Land Cover and Land Use Change Information

John - Jones --- Land - Final - 4 - Print

Images below are the images from the poster from left to right; top to bottom

Image Credit: NASA Land Processes Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC)
Image Credit: NASA Land Processes Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC)

Global MODIS Vegetation Indices - April 2015

This image shows global monthly Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) included in the MOD13C2 product. Vegetation indices are used for globally monitoring vegetation conditions and are used in products displaying land cover and land cover changes. These data may be used as input for modeling global biogeochemical and hydrologic processes and global and regional climate. These data also may be used for characterizing land surface biophysical properties, including land cover. Data available through the NASA Land Processes Distributed Active Archive Center (LP DAAC).

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Image Credit: NASA Socioeconomic Data and Applications Center (SEDAC)
Image Credit: NASA Socioeconomic Data and Applications Center (SEDAC)

Anthropogenic Biomes of the World - Europe

Anthropogenic biomes data sets describe potential natural vegetation, biomes, as transformed by sustained human population density and land use including agriculture and urbanization. Anthropogenic biome categories (Anthromes) are defined by population density and land-use intensity. The data consists of 19 anthrome classes in six broad categories. Data available through NASA Socioeconomic Data and Applications Center (SEDAC).

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Image Credit: NASA SEDAC
Image Credit: NASA SEDAC

Spatial Distribution for Net Primary Productivity - Africa

The Global Patterns in Net Primary Productivity (NPP) portion of the HANPP Collection maps the net amount of solar energy converted to plant organic matter through photosynthesis. NPP is measured in units of elemental carbon and represents the primary food energy source for the world's ecosystems. Data available through NASA SEDAC.

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Image Credit: NASA GSFC/METI/ERSDAC/JAROS & U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team
Image Credit: NASA GSFC/METI/ERSDAC/JAROS & U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team

Lake Natron, Tanzania

Lake Natron, Tanzania is located in Africa’s Great Rift Valley. The highly alkaline lake mineral is fed by mineral rich hot springs and impacted by volcanic ash from the Great Rift Valley. Because of the unique biodiversity, Tanzania named the Lake Natron Basin to the Ramsar List of Wetlands of International Importance on 4 July 2001. This simulated natural color Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission Radiometer (ASTER) image was acquired on March 8, 2003. Data available through NASA LP DAAC.

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Image Credit: Arizona Department of Water Resources
Image Credit: Arizona Department of Water Resources

Subsidence in the McMullen Valley Groundwater Basin, Arizona

The colored bands in this Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) interferogram show the gradual sinking of land (subsidence) in Arizona’s McMullen Valley Groundwater Basin between April 2010 and May 2015. The colored bands in this interferogram show the gradual sinking of land (subsidence) in Arizona’s McMullen Valley Groundwater Basin between April 2010 and May 2015. The McMullen Basin is an agricultural area located about 100 miles (161 km) west of Phoenix, AZ, and covers almost 650 square miles (about 1,684 square km). In the interferogram above, subsidence is indicated where the color sequence goes blue, red, yellow, green, blue, etc. (or any combination, but going through the colors in this order). Uplift is indicated where the color sequence goes blue, green, yellow, red, blue, etc. (or any combination, but going through the colors in this order). SAR data are available through the NASA Alaska Satellite Facility (ASF) DAAC. Find out more in-depth information about the image.

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Image Credit: LANCE/EOSDIS Rapid Response
Image Credit: LANCE/EOSDIS Rapid Response

Fires in the Western U.S - July 4, 2015

This MODIS Aqua image shows fires and smoke from multiple fires in the Western United States in early July 2015. A key resource for wildland firefighters and managers around the world is NASA’s Fire Information for Resource Management System (FIRMS), which is part of NASA’s Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS).Through FIRMS, users can interactively view fire data via the Web Fire Mapper; search the entire archive of active fire / hot spot data derived from the MODIS instrument aboard NASA’s Aqua and Terra satellites; and sign up to receive automated FIRMS Fire Email Alerts for their geographic areas of interest. Visualize and download near real-time MODIS fires and thermal anomalies data using NASA's Worldview.

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Image Credit: NASA Oak Ridge National Laboratory DAAC
Image Credit: NASA Oak Ridge National Laboratory DAAC

Harmonized Global Land Use for Years 1900 and 2100

These data represent fractional land use and land cover patterns annually for the years 1900 and 2100 for the globe at 0.5-degree (~50-km) spatial resolution. Land use categories of cropland, pasture, primary land, secondary (recovering) land, and urban land, and underlying annual land-use transitions, are included. Annual data on age and biomass density of secondary land, as well as annual wood harvest, are included for each grid cell. Historical land cover data for the years 1500–2005 are based on HYDE 3.1 and future land cover projections for the period 2006–2100 came from four Integrated Assessment Model (IAM) scenarios which reach different levels of radiative forcing by year 2100: MESSAGE (8.5 W/m2), AIM (6 W/m2), GCAM (4.5 W/m2), and IMAGE (2.6 W/m2). These data are available at the NASA Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) DAAC.

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Image Credit:  LANCE/EOSDIS Rapid Response.
Image Credit: LANCE/EOSDIS Rapid Response.

Flooding in Arkansas and Oklahoma - May 2015

May 2015 brought record to near-record rainfall in much of the deep southern United States. This caused flooding and evacuations in Arkansas, Texas, and Oklahoma. This false-color MODIS Aqua satellite image, acquired on May 26, 2015 shows the Arkansas River as it runs through Oklahoma and Arkansas. On May 26, the river reached 33.39 feet (10.18 meters) at the Van Buren gauge near Fort Smith. Flood stage at that area is 22 feet; above 31 feet is considered a major flood.

Caption courtesy: NASA Earth Observatory.

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Image Credit: NASA GSFC/METI/Japan Space Systems & U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team
Image Credit: NASA GSFC/METI/Japan Space Systems & U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team

Agricultural Practices around the World

Agricultural practices have developed as a function of topography, soil type, crop type, annual rainfall, and tradition. In this montage of six ASTER sub-images, the differences are graphically illustrated by the variation in field geometry and size. In Minnesota (upper left) the very regular grid pattern reflects early 19th century surveying; the size of the fields is a function of mechanization and that dictates a certain efficiency. In Kansas (upper middle), center pivot irrigation is responsible for the field pattern. In northwest Germany (upper right), the small size and random pattern of fields is a leftover from the Middle Ages. Near Santa Cruz, Bolivia (lower left), the pie or radial patterned fields are part of a settlement scheme; at the center of each unit is a small community. Outside of Bangkok, Thailand (lower middle), rice paddies fed by an extensive network of canals that is hundreds of years old, appear as small skinny rectangular fields. And in the Cerrado in southern Brazil (lower right), cheap cost of land and its flatness have resulted in enormous farms and large field sizes. Each ASTER sub-image covers an area of 10.5 x 12 km. ASTER data are available through the NASA LP DAAC.

Caption Credit: NASA/GSFC/METI/Japan Space Systems, and U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team

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Last Updated: Sep 6, 2017 at 4:45 PM EDT