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Greenhouse Gases Data Pathfinder

Smoke stacks at a power-generating facility. Burning fossil fuels for electricity is a source of greenhouse gas emissions.

Burning fossil fuels for electricity is a source of greenhouse gas emissions. Photo by Brendan O'Donnell via Unsplash.

Gases that trap heat in the atmosphere are called greenhouse gases (GHGs). Since the industrial revolution in the mid-1800s, human activities have increased the concentrations of GHGs in the atmosphere. The planet's average surface temperature has risen about 2.12 degrees Fahrenheit (1.18 degrees Celsius) since the late 19th century, and 10 of the warmest years on record have been observed since 2005. GHGs include carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O), chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), ozone (O3), and water vapor (H2O). Airborne, satellite, and ground-based instruments measure the composition of GHGs in the atmosphere, providing insight into how their composition is changing over time.

Remotely sensed GHG data are used in atmospheric models to estimate the sources and sinks of these gases. These data allow researchers to employ a top-down approach to emissions inventories, as opposed to a bottom-up approach which involves compiling an inventory of emissions from various sources. Satellite and aircraft-borne remote sensors can cover more area than in situ sensors and have the potential to shed light on sources and hotspots of GHG emissions, such as methane leaks or the effects of droughts and heatwaves, that may not be known from the bottom-up bookkeeping approach.

This data pathfinder is focused on satellite and airborne measurements of greenhouse gases, although some notable ground-based measurements of carbon dioxide are included. Some satellite datasets are available in near real-time (generally within three hours of a satellite observation) through NASA’s Land, Atmosphere Near real-time Capability for EOS (LANCE) and provide valuable information on the sources of climate-warming gases.

The datasets listed below can be downloaded though Earthdata Search. Learn more about how to use Earthdata Search and other tools to visualize and explore data in the Tools for Data Access and Visualization section.

About the Data

About the Data

NASA collaborates with other federal entities and international space organizations, including NOAA and the European Space Agency (ESA), to collect and distribute greenhouse gases data. Datasets referenced in this pathfinder are from satellite, airborne, and ground-based sensors shown in the tables below. The first table includes datasets from satellite instruments, with their spatial and temporal resolutions. Note that many satellites/platforms carry multiple sensors; the table below only lists the primary sensor used in collecting the specified measurement. The second table includes airborne and ground-based measurements, with their spatial and temporal coverage.

Note: This is not an exhaustive list of datasets but rather only includes datasets from NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS).

Platform Sensor Spatial Resolution Temporal Resolution Measurement
Aqua Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) 1° x 1° Daily, Monthly CO2, CH4, H2O
Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2) OCO-2 2.25 km x 1.29 km Daily CO2
International Space Station (ISS) Orbiting Carbon Observatory-3 (OCO-3) 2.25 km x 1.29 km Daily CO2
Aura Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) 0.53 km x 5.3 km Daily, Monthly CO2, CH4, N2O, O3, H2O
Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) 4° x 5° Near Real-Time, Daily, Monthly N2O, O3, H2O
Aura Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) 1° x 1°, 0.25° x 0.25° Near Real-Time, Daily O3
Sentinel-5 Precursor (Sentinel-5P) Tropospheric Monitoring Instrument (TROPOMI) 5.5 km x 3.5 km Daily, Monthly O3, CH4
Joint NASA/NOAA Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (Suomi NPP) Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) 1° x 1° Near Real-Time, Daily O3
Aura High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS) 1° zonal Daily N2O, CFCs
Suomi NPP Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) and Cross-Track Infrared Sounder (CrIS), collectively known as the Cross-track Infrared and Microwave Sounding Suite (CrIMSS) 1° x 1° Daily, Monthly H2O

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NASA conducts airborne and ground campaigns to obtain high-resolution temporal and spatial measurements of complex local processes, which can be coupled to global satellite observations for a better understanding of Earth system processes. The airborne and ground measurements included in this pathfinder are in the table below.

Project Spatial Coverage Temporal Coverage Measurement
Arctic Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE) Alaska and Western Canada 2015 - 2017 CO2, CH4, H2O
Atmospheric Carbon and Transport - America (ACT-America) Central and Eastern United States Jul-Aug 2016, Jan-Mar 2017, Oct-Nov 2017, Apr-May 2018, Jun-Jul 2019 CO2, CH4, N2O, O3
Atmospheric Tomography Mission (ATom) Global July 2016 - May 2018 CO2, CH4, N2O, O3, CFCs, H2O
Carbon in Arctic Reservoirs Vulnerability Experiment (CARVE) Alaskan Arctic 2011 - 2015 CO2, CH4, H2O
Coastal Wetland Elevation and Carbon Flux Inventory United States 2006 - 2011 CO2, CH4
Database of Road Transportation Emissions (DARTE) United States 1980 - 2017 CO2
Methane Sources, Vista, California California 2005 - 2019 CH4
North American Carbon Program (NACP) North America 2000 - Present CO2, CH4, N2O
Vulcan Conterminous United States and the state of Alaska 2010 - 2015 CO2

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Find Carbon Dioxide Data

Find Carbon Dioxide Data
Global map of average carbon dioxide concentrations for July 2017 measured by NASA’s Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2).

Global average carbon dioxide concentrations for July 2017 measured by NASA’s Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2).

Carbon dioxide (CO2) is an important greenhouse gas that is released through human activities such as burning fossil fuels and deforestation, as well as natural processes such as plant respiration and volcanic eruptions. Once CO2 is added to the atmosphere, it persists for a long time: between 300 to 1,000 years. Humans have increased the amount of CO2 in the atmosphere by about 47% since the Industrial Revolution began.


Satellite Data

Airborne Data

  • Carbon in Arctic Reservoirs Vulnerability Experiment (CARVE)
    CARVE is an Earth Venture Suborbital-1 (EVS-1) mission
    funded in 2010 as part of NASA's Earth System Science Pathfinder (ESSP) Mission. From 2011 through 2015, CARVE collected detailed measurements of greenhouse gases in the Alaskan Arctic and developed models to quantify Arctic carbon fluxes and carbon cycle-climate processes. CARVE provides an integrated set of greenhouse gas data that provide experimental insights into Arctic carbon cycling.

  • Atmospheric Tomography Mission (ATom)
    ATom is a NASA Earth Venture Suborbital-2 (EVS-2) mission
    to study the impact of human-produced air pollution on greenhouse gases and on chemically reactive gases in the atmosphere. ATom deployed an extensive gas and aerosol payload on NASA's DC-8 aircraft for systematic, global-scale sampling of the atmosphere, profiling continuously from 0.2 to 12 km altitude. Around-the-world flights were conducted in each of the four seasons between 2016 and 2018.

  • Atmospheric Carbon and Transport - America (ACT-America)
    ACT-America is a NASA EVS-2 mission
    that studied the transport and fluxes of atmospheric carbon dioxide and methane. Starting in the summer of 2016, ACT-America conducted five airborne campaigns across three regions in the Eastern United States to study the transport and fluxes of these two gases. The final campaign concluded in the summer of 2019.

  • Arctic Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE)
    In 2017, NASA's ABoVE used aircraft equipped with the Airborne Visible Infrared Imaging Spectrometer - Next Generation (AVIRIS-NG) instrument to fly over 11,583 mi2 (30,000 km2) of the Arctic landscape to measure carbon monoxide (CO), CO2, CH4, and H2O concentrations.

Ground Data

  • Database of Road Transportation Emissions (DARTE)
    The DARTE dataset provides a 38-year inventory of annual on-road carbon dioxide emissions for the conterminous United States. The dataset is 1-km resolution and is based on roadway-level vehicle traffic data and state-specific emissions factors for multiple vehicle types on urban and rural roads.

  • North American Carbon Program (NACP)
    The NACP is a multidisciplinary research program designed to improve understanding of North America's carbon sources, sinks, and stocks. NACP compiles data from the following independent atmospheric monitoring networks: Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE), Comprehensive Oculomotor Behavioral Response Assessment (COBRA), Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment-A (INTEX-A), INTEX-B, Irvine Latitude Network, NOAA Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory (CMDL), Scripps, and Stanley Tyler-UC Irvine. The primary focus of this effort was the compilation of non-CO2 greenhouse gases over North America, but numerous CO2 observations are also included. The NACP is supported by a number of different federal agencies.

  • Vulcan
    The Vulcan project provides estimates of CO2 emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels and from cement production for the conterminous United States and the state of Alaska. The emissions data from Vulcan are categorized into 10 source sectors, including residential, commercial, industrial, electricity production, on-road, non-road, commercial marine vessel, airport, rail, and cement. Data are gridded annually on a 1-km grid for the years 2010 to 2015.

  • Coastal Wetland Elevation and Carbon Flux Inventory
    The Coastal Wetland Elevation and Carbon Flux Inventory dataset provides maps of coastal wetland carbon and methane fluxes and coastal wetland surface elevation from 2006 to 2011 at 30-meter resolution for coastal wetlands of the conterminous United States. Total coastal wetland carbon flux per year per pixel was calculated by combining maps of wetland type and change with soil, biomass, and methane flux data from a literature review.

Find Methane Data

Find Methane Data
Global map of average methane concentrations for January 2016, measured by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS).

Average methane concentrations for January 2016, measured by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) aboard NASA’s Aqua satellite. NASA Earth Observatory map by Joshua Stevens.

Methane (CH4) is much less abundant in the atmosphere than CO2, but it’s also more powerful. On a per-pound-basis, CH4 is 30 times more powerful than CO2 at trapping heat over 100 years, which makes it the second most important anthropogenic greenhouse gas. Sources of methane emissions include livestock production, rice fields, oil and gas production, landfills, biomass burning, and natural sources such as microbial processes in wetlands. Methane concentrations are now 150% higher than in the mid 19th century.

Satellite Data

Airborne Data

  • Arctic Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE)
    In 2017, NASA's ABoVE used aircraft equipped with the AVIRIS-NG instrument to fly over 11,583 mi2 (30,000 km2) of the Arctic landscape to measure methane concentrations.

  • Methane Sources, Vista California and the California Methane Survey
    The Vista California datasets provide locations of potential CH4 emitting facilities and infrastructure spanning the state of California, created from an assortment of publicly available data sources from local, state, and federal agencies for the years 2005 to 2019. Often referred to collectively as Vista-CA, these data consist of detailed spatial maps for facilities and infrastructure in California that are known or expected sources of CH4 emissions and illustrate the spatial distribution of potential CH4 sources. The final Vista-CA database contains over 900,000 entries, which are presented as 15 methane-emitting infrastructure maps. The database is instrumental to the California Methane Survey, an ongoing project to measure CH4 emissions in California with the AVIRIS-NG instrument.

  • Carbon in Arctic Reservoirs Vulnerability Experiment (CARVE)
    CARVE is an Earth Venture Suborbital-1 (EVS-1) mission
    funded in 2010 as part of NASA's ESSP Mission. From 2011 through 2015, CARVE collected detailed measurements of greenhouse gases in the Alaskan Arctic and developed models to quantify Arctic carbon fluxes and carbon cycle-climate processes. CARVE provides an integrated set of greenhouse gas data that provide experimental insights into Arctic carbon cycling.

  • Atmospheric Carbon and Transport - America (ACT-America)
    ACT-America is a NASA EVS-2 mission
    that studied the transport and fluxes of atmospheric CO2 and CH4. Starting in the summer of 2016, ACT-America conducted five airborne campaigns across three regions in the Eastern United States to study the transport and fluxes of these two gases.

  • Atmospheric Tomography Mission (ATom)
    ATom is a NASA EVS-2 mission
    to study the impact of human-produced air pollution on greenhouse gases and on chemically reactive gases in the atmosphere. ATom deployed an extensive gas and aerosol payload on NASA's DC-8 aircraft for systematic, global-scale sampling of the atmosphere, profiling continuously from 0.2 to 12 km altitude. Around-the-world flights were conducted in each of the four seasons between 2016 and 2018.

Find Nitrous Oxide Data

Find Nitrous Oxide Data
Global map of nitrous oxide concentrations for April 4, 2021, measured by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) instrument.

Nitrous oxide concentrations for April 4, 2021, measured by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) instrument aboard the joint NASA/multi-national Aura satellite.

Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a powerful greenhouse gas that is about 100 times more potent per pound than carbon dioxide over 100 years. N2O is emitted from agricultural soil management, the combustion of fossil fuels, industrial activities, and manure management. N2O is also a stratospheric-ozone-depleting substance.

Satellite Data

  • Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS)
    The MLS instrument aboard NASA's Aura satellite makes measurements of atmospheric composition, temperature, humidity, and cloud ice that are needed to track the stability of the stratospheric ozone layer, help improve predictions of climate change and variability, and help improve understanding of global air quality. Near real-time (NRT) N2O data are available through NASA’s Land, Atmosphere Near real-time Capability for EOS (LANCE).

  • Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES)
    TES
     is an instrument aboard NASA's Aura satellite, and was launched on July 15, 2004. TES provided measurements of O3, H2O, CO, CH4, N2O, and HNO3 for 16 orbits every other day. Data collection for TES was completed in January 2018.

  • High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS)
    Launched in 2004, HIRDLS is an instrument aboard NASA's Aura satellite. The science goals of HIRDLS were to observe global distribution of temperature and concentrations of O3, H2O, CH4, N2O, NO2, HNO3, N2O5, CFC-11, CFC-12, and ClONO2. After launch, activation of the HIRDLS instrument revealed that the optical path was blocked so that only 20% of the aperture could view Earth's atmosphere. However, even with the 80% blockage, measurements at high vertical resolution could be made at one scan angle. HIRDLS stopped recording observations in March 2008.

Airborne Data

  • Atmospheric Tomography Mission (ATom)
    ATom is a NASA Earth Venture Suborbital-2 (EVS-2) mission
    to study the impact of human-produced air pollution on greenhouse gases and on chemically reactive gases in the atmosphere. ATom deployed an extensive gas and aerosol payload on NASA's DC-8 aircraft for systematic, global-scale sampling of the atmosphere, profiling continuously from 0.2 to 12 km altitude. Around-the-world flights were conducted in each of the four seasons between 2016 and 2018.

  • Atmospheric Carbon and Transport - America (ACT-America)
    ACT-America is a NASA EVS-2 mission
    that studied the transport and fluxes of atmospheric CO2 and CH4. Starting in the summer of 2016, ACT-America conducted five airborne campaigns across three regions in the Eastern United States to study the transport and fluxes of these two gases. The final campaign concluded in the summer of 2019.

Find Ozone Data

Find Ozone Data
Map of ozone concentrations for December 16, 2017.

Ozone concentrations for December 16, 2017 (in Dobson Units [DU]) measured by the Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) aboard the joint NASA/NOAA Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership satellite (Suomi NPP). Image by NASA’s NPP Ozone Science Team.

Ozone (O3) is present both in the troposphere (or lower atmosphere) and the stratosphere (the layer above the troposphere), but has different impacts in each layer. In the troposphere, O3 serves as a potent greenhouse gas and air pollutant that can aggravate existing health problems in humans, especially those with respiratory illnesses. O3 forms from chemical reactions between nitrogen oxides and volatile organic compounds (VOCs), emitted primarily from cars, power plants, and other industrial facilities. These reactions take place in the presence of sunlight, and unhealthy levels of O3 are most often observed on very sunny days and in urban environments. In the stratosphere, O3 protects humans, plants, and animals from harmful UV radiation.

Satellite Data

Find Chlorofluorocarbons Data

Find Chlorofluorocarbons Data

Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) are greenhouse gases that trap substantially more heat than CO2. Per pound, CFCs can be thousands or tens of thousands times more powerful at trapping heat than carbon dioxide. These gases also deplete the protective ozone layer in the stratosphere. CFCs were first used in the 1930s as refrigerants and propellants for chemical sprays. Two years after the discovery of the Antarctic ozone hole in 1985, nations of the world signed the Montreal Protocol, which regulated ozone-depleting compounds and eventually phased out the production of CFCs.

Satellite Data

  • High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS)
    Launched in 2004, HIRDLS is an instrument aboard NASA's Aura satellite. The science goals of HIRDLS are to observe global distribution of temperature and concentrations of O3, H2O, CH4, N2O, NO2, HNO3, N2O5, CFC-11, CFC-12, and ClONO2. After launch, activation of the HIRDLS instrument revealed that the optical path was blocked so that only 20% of the aperture could view Earth's atmosphere. However, even with 80% blockage, measurements at high vertical resolution could be made at one scan angle. HIRDLS stopped recording observations in March 2008.

Airborne Data

  • Atmospheric Tomography Mission (ATom)
    ATom is a NASA Earth Venture Suborbital-2 (EVS-2) mission
    to study the impact of human-produced air pollution on greenhouse gases and on chemically reactive gases in the atmosphere. ATom deployed an extensive gas and aerosol payload on NASA's DC-8 aircraft for systematic, global-scale sampling of the atmosphere, profiling continuously from 0.2 to 12 km altitude. Around-the-world flights were conducted in each of the four seasons between 2016 and 2018.

Find Water Vapor Data

Find Water Vapor Data

Water vapor (H2O) is the most abundant greenhouse gas in the atmosphere. Heat radiated from Earth's surface is absorbed by H2O molecules in the lower atmosphere. H2O also plays an important role in weather and the hydrologic cycle. Changing temperatures can alter the amount of H2O in the atmosphere. As the atmosphere warms, it can hold more H2O which then causes more warming, creating a feedback loop.

Satellite Data

  • Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS)
    Data from the AIRS instrument aboard NASA’s Aqua satellite provide 3D measurements of temperature, H2O, trace gases, and surface and cloud properties through the atmospheric column. AIRS data are used by weather prediction centers around the world to improve their forecasts. They also are used to assess the skill of climate models and in applications ranging from volcanic plume detection to drought forecasting.

  • Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) instrument
    The MLS instrument aboard NASA's Aura satellite makes measurements of atmospheric composition, temperature, humidity, and cloud ice that are needed to track the stability of the stratospheric ozone layer, help improve predictions of climate change and variability, and help improve understanding of global air quality. MLS water vapor data are available as daily, monthly, and near real-time (NRT) products.

  • Cross-track Infrared and Microwave Sounding Suite (CrIMSS)
    NASA's Sounder Science Investigator-led Processing System (Sounder SIPS) is responsible for processing and reprocessing data products from two instruments aboard the joint NASA/NOAA Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (Suomi NPP) satellite: the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) and the Cross-Track Infrared Sounder (CrIS), collectively referred to as the Cross-track Infrared and Microwave Sounding Suite (CrIMSS). Sounder SIPS global gridded H2O products use the scientific algorithm software from the Suomi NPP Science Team’s Sounder Discipline Group.

  • Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES)
    TES
     is an instrument aboard NASA's Aura satellite, which launched on July 15, 2004. TES provided measurements of O3, H2O, CO, CH4, NO2, and HNO3 for 16 orbits every other day. Data collection for TES was completed in January 2018. TES data are available in daily and monthly averages.

Airborne Data

  • Atmospheric Tomography Mission (ATom)
    ATom is a NASA Earth Venture Suborbital-2 (EVS-2) mission
    to study the impact of human-produced air pollution on greenhouse gases and on chemically reactive gases in the atmosphere. ATom deployed an extensive gas and aerosol payload on NASA's DC-8 aircraft for systematic, global-scale sampling of the atmosphere, profiling continuously from 0.2 to 12 km altitude. Around-the-world flights were conducted in each of the four seasons between 2016 and 2018.

  • Carbon in Arctic Reservoirs Vulnerability Experiment (CARVE)
    CARVE is an Earth Venture Suborbital mission funded
    in 2010 as part of NASA's ESSP Mission. From 2011 through 2015, CARVE collected detailed measurements of greenhouse gases in the Alaskan Arctic and developed models to quantify Arctic carbon fluxes and carbon cycle-climate processes. CARVE provides an integrated set of greenhouse gas data that provides experimental insights into Arctic carbon cycling.

  • Arctic Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE)
    In 2017, NASA's ABoVE used aircraft equipped with the AVIRIS-NG instrument to fly over 11,583 mi2 (30,000 km2) of the Arctic landscape to measure CO, CO2, CH4, and H2O concentrations.

Other NASA Assets of Interest

Other NASA Assets of Interest

NASA Climate
Current news and data streams about climate change from NASA.

Health and Air Quality Data Pathfinder
Find and visualize NASA air quality data.

Carbon Mapper
Planet, with assistance from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, CA, is providing the first two satellites that will enable a nonprofit organization called Carbon Mapper to pinpoint and measure point-sources of methane and carbon dioxide globally. The first two Carbon Mapper satellites are scheduled for a 2023 launch.

Methane Source Finder
Methane Source Finder is an interactive map that helps you explore methane data and related infrastructure in the state of California.

Tools for Data Access and Visualization

Tools for Data Access and Visualization

Earthdata Search | Panoply | Giovanni | Worldview | Visualize CARVE data

Earthdata Search is a tool for discovering Earth Observation data collections from EOSDIS, as well as U.S and international agencies across Earth science disciplines.

Users can search for and read about data collections, search for data files by date and spatial area, preview browse images, and download or submit requests for data files, with customization for select data collections.

Screenshot of the Search Earthdata site.

In the project area, for some datasets, you can customize your granule. You can reformat the data and output as HDF, NetCDF, ASCII, KML, or a GeoTIFF. You can also choose from a variety of projection options. Lastly, you can subset the data, obtaining only the bands that are needed.

Earthdata Search customization tools diagram.

Panoply

HDF and NetCDF format files can be viewed in Panoply, a cross-platform application that plots geo-referenced and other arrays. Panoply offers additional functionality, such as slicing and plotting arrays, combining arrays, and exporting plots and animations.

Giovanni

Giovanni is an online environment for the display and analysis of geophysical parameters. There are many options for analysis. The following are the more popular ones.

  • Time-averaged maps are a simple way to observe the variability of data values over a region of interest.
  • Map animations are a means to observe spatial patterns and detect unusual events over time.
  • Area-averaged time series are used to display the value of a data variable that has been averaged from all the data values acquired for a selected region for each time step.
  • Histogram plots are used to display the distribution of values of a data variable in a selected region and time interval.

For more detailed tutorials:

  • Giovanni How-To’s on NASA's GES DISC YouTube channel.
  • Data recipe for downloading a Giovanni map as NetCDF and converting its data to quantifiable map data in the form of latitude-longitude-data value ASCII text.

Worldview

NASA's Worldview data visualization application provides the capability to interactively browse over 900 global, full-resolution satellite imagery layers and then download the underlying data. Many of the available imagery layers are updated within three hours of a satellite observation, essentially showing the entire Earth as it looks “right now.” This supports time-critical application areas such as wildfire management, air quality measurements, and flood monitoring. Imagery in Worldview is provided by NASA’s Global Imagery Browse Services (GIBS). Worldview also includes nine geostationary imagery layers from GOES-East, GOES-West, and Himawari-8 that are available at 10-minute increments for the last 30 days. These layers include Red Visible, which can be used for analyzing daytime clouds, fog, insolation, and winds; Clean Infrared, which provides cloud top temperature and information about precipitation; and Air Mass RGB, which enables the visualization of the differentiation between air mass types (e.g., dry air, moist air, etc.). These full disk hemispheric views allow for almost real-time viewing of changes occurring around most of the world.

Worldview allows users to animate imagery over time and do a screen-by-screen comparison of data for different time periods or a comparison of different datasets.

Worldview data visualization of the nighttime lights in Puerto Rico pre- and post- Hurricane Maria, which made landfall on September 20, 2017. Post-hurricane image shows widespread outages around San Juan, including key hospital and transportation infrastructure.

Worldview Suomi NPP/VIIRS nighttime lights comparison image showing power outages caused by Hurricane Irma in September 2017. The right image (acquired 1 September 2017) shows the island before Hurricane Irma. The left image (acquired 9 September 2017) shows power outages across island after Hurricane Irma. NASA Worldview image.

Visualize CARVE Data

From 2011 to 2015, the Carbon in Arctic Reservoirs Vulnerability Experiment (CARVE) mission collected airborne measurements of atmospheric CO2, CH4, H2O, and and relevant land surface parameters in the Alaskan Arctic. Visualize CO2, CH4, and H2O data from CARVE flights using the CARVE data visualizer from NASA’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center (ORNL DAAC).

Visualize carbon dioxide, methane, and water vapor data from CARVE flights using the CARVE data visualizer.

Published April 28, 2021

Page Last Updated: May 26, 2021 at 11:32 PM EDT